Bible Study

And on the second day were gathered together the chief of the fathers of all the people, the priests, and the Levites, unto Ezra the scribe, even to understand the words of the law. – Nehemiah 8:13

bible_study_candlelightThe entire congregation met the day before in formal worship. On this occasion, a smaller group meets in order to understand a part of the law.

Whether it is a preacher’s meeting, a church organized meeting, or an informal meeting in your home, when you meet to understand the word of God, you are having a Bible study. And this is a good thing!

Consider this:

These were more noble than those in Thessalonica, in that they received the word with all readiness of mind, and searched the scriptures daily, whether those things were so. – Acts 17:11

Now, the brethren at Thessalonica were not slackers concerning their devotion.  The endured a lot of persecution during Paul’s visit and no doubt afterward as well.  Paul even says the manner in which they received the gospel in such conditions was an evidence of their election by God (1st Thessalonians 1:4).

However, Luke records that the brethren at Berea were more noble. On what criteria did he base this conclusion? Their amount of Bible study.

Our discipleship is not just attending a worship service and a few other activities. To be disciples we must truly be learning the discipline of the life of Christ. This cannot be accomplished in only an hour or so on Sunday morning. I personally cannot see how a pastor can accomplish the duty of teaching the congregation without a time for congregants to ask questions and gain clarification. Asking a preacher a question and “questioning” a preacher are not the same thing.

We (including preachers) all need to realize we don’t know everything there is to know about our Wonderful Savior. Therefore, we should all be good Bible students in formal worship, in personal study, in family fellowship, and in Bible study whenever possible.

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